From Coloniality to International Climate Negotiations: Different Understandings of Vulnerability among Indigenous People and the Chilean State

From Coloniality to International Climate Negotiations: Different Understandings of Vulnerability among Indigenous People and the Chilean State
Date
12 March 2020, 5.00pm - 7.30pm
Type
Seminar
Venue
Room 944, UCL Institute of Education, Bedford Way, Bloomsbury, WC1H 0AL
Description

Rosario Carmona, University of Bonn

Drawing from research among the Mapuche, this presentation seeks to discuss how climate vulnerability has been socially constructed in territories that are inhabited by indigenous communities. Since the constitution of the republic (1818), a regime of coloniality has been strengthened in Chile through a development model based on an extractive economy, where the forest industry is the second largest sector. Due to its huge environmental and social impacts on indigenous territories, this activity has increased poverty and inequality levels, creating barriers that are very difficult to overcome. These local impacts are generating forms of vulnerability that are part of broader climate change processes.

However, the asymmetries involved in these processes have not been sufficiently discussed by officials and climate change policymakers. In line with the international agenda, Chile is designing strategies to address climate change. Yet it is doing so without critically reviewing the factors that produce inequality and increase climate change vulnerability. Nor have the contributions of indigenous knowledge to address climate change been considered, despite Mapuche communities’ long coexistence with the environment.

Notwithstanding, in the last few years indigenous knowledge has gained particular relevance in the academic and scientific worlds and indigenous actors are getting prominence in international negotiations. Since 2016 political parties and indigenous organizations are working on a Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform (LCIPP). This presentation will analyze how these international mechanisms have promoted the relationship between indigenous people and climate policymakers in Chile, especially since the country assumed the COP Presidency in 2019.


All are welcome. Attendance is free. Booking is recommended

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Contact

Olga Jimenez
olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk
020 7862 8871